Winterview with Author George R. McNeese

To celebrate 13 weeks of winter, Hàlön Chronicles will be conducting one interview a week for 13 weeks. We’ve also partnered with additional artists and authors for a few surprises throughout the winter. Join us on the hashtag #13Winterviews, or check out our blog hop for a sneak peek at who’s on the roster in the coming weeks.

Hosted by: K. J. Harrowick

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself.

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I was born on January 23rd in Chicago, but I have roots in the South. I moved to Georgia when I was thirteen. It was there that I started writing. I remember writing adventure stories of Detective Falcon and his sidekick, Rush (ode to the Mega Man series). I got a lot of praise for my work. (Someone actually tried to write a story with characters I created.) My passion for writing didn’t really take off until college. I attended Georgia Perimeter College for two years. My original major was Elementary Education. As part of my elective requirement, I took a Creative Writing class. From there, I was hooked. I even had a poem and short story published in the school’s literary magazine, Creative License. I still have a copy of the issue that my works were published in. After two years, I transferred to Georgia State University in Atlanta. I also changed my major to English with a Creative Writing concentration. I graduated in 2002 with a Bachelor’s Degree in the field. (Fun fact: it’s still in the mailing tube. I haven’t found a frame for it.) After school, I dabbled in writing here and there. In that span, I married my best friend and I have two wonderful children. Trying to keep up with them and work doesn’t leave a lot of time for writing. But recently, I decided to take writing more seriously. I started a blog three years ago and joined a slew of writing groups on Facebook. They have been so helpful and encouraging in my writing journey.

2. What types of books do you write, and why?

I write short stories, though I hope to have some published in an anthology like the Pushcart Prize or have a collection of stories. I write in Contemporary Fiction because that is what I read throughout school and into adulthood. It’s what I “know.”

3. What were your early influences, and how does this manifest in your work today?

Some of my early influences were playwrights like Tennessee Williams and Shakespeare. In terms of novels, I would say F. Scott Fitzgerald is the most memorable influence. I remember reading their works and imagine being a director and seeing their plays unfold. The themes of love and loss play a pivotal role in the works I write. A lot of my stories revolve around relationships of varying degrees and how internal and external forces affect the dynamics.

4. Are there aspects of the craft that excite you more than others?

Writing the first draft excites me more than anything else. I love the feeling of getting the story out onto the page for the first time. I admit that it is the most intimidating because I’m starting fresh and I have no idea if the idea can be fleshed out to a full-fledged story. But I relish in the challenge of getting the words out there. To see the potential of a story come to fruition.

5. What books or websites are your go-to places while editing?

The biggest challenge I find with short stories is the restriction the format puts in place. I’ve read from multiple sources that the largest word count for a short story is 7,500-10,000 words. And that knowledge heightens and intensifies certain aspects of stories. For example, longer works can spread the story throughout days and weeks. Even months. Short stories don’t have that luxury. With any format, the writer has to be able to hook the reader right away. In the short story format, the writer has to be able to hook the reader with a couple of paragraphs. Certainly within the first page. Developing well-rounded characters is much more important in short stories. Writers have to be more selective in what details are most important and most impactful to the story.

But I think that’s where short stories have an advantage. Because readers don’t always have the time to fully vest themselves into novels, a shorter work can focus on a specific time frame and, if done right, can experience the same impact.

6. Tell us about your writing space.

I really don’t have a traditional writing space. I don’t have a section in my house that’s exclusively for writing. If I’m at home, I’m usually at my kitchen table with either my laptop, notebook, or both, depending on what I’m working on. I keep my iPhone nearby so that I can stream Spotify. (It’s easier to stream music on my phone than on the laptop.) Most of the time, I don’t keep any food or drinks nearby. It can be a distraction. (It’s another story if I’m at a local coffee shop or Barnes and Noble.)

7. Tell us about your current WIP or your latest book release.

As it stands right now, I don’t have anything in the works. But I am thinking about ideas that have the potential to become full-fledged stories. Even if I was in the middle of a project, ideas are percolating in my head. That can be a double-edged sword if not handled properly.

Host note: George was kind enough to share one of his short stories for Winterviews. Click below to read The First Timer.

The First Timer The First Timer
Sean tells me of a barber shop off Richland Street. “Cairo,” he says, “is an awesome shop. It’s just like Winston’s, but better.” What he fails to tell me is that I have to drive through downtown.

Click here to read George R. McNeese’s short story, The First Timer.


If anyone wants to reach me, I’m on Twitter most of the time. My handle is @George_McNeese. I have a blog (Project Blacklight) where I share my works and everything that is going on in my writing and personal life. Those are the two best ways to connect with me.

Original article posted on Hàlön Chronicles. Don’t forget to check out this year’s Winterviews and partner interviews. You can also follow Hàlön Chronicles and be the first to know when new content is released.

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Winterview with Author Alon Shalev

To celebrate 13 weeks of winter, Hàlön Chronicles will be conducting one interview a week for 13 weeks. We’ve also partnered with additional artists and authors for a few surprises throughout the winter. Join us on the hashtag #13Winterviews, or check out our blog hop for a sneak peek at who’s on the roster in the coming weeks.

Hosted by: K. J. Harrowick

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself.

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I have been writing for many years and had three social justice themed novels published. In 2011, while on a family camping trip in Northern California, I began writing a Young Adult epic fantasy novel with my then 11 and 8 year-old sons. We would write during the day (sometimes together and other times just me) and then I would read it back to them at night around the campfire or snuggling in our tent. That novel, At The Walls Of Galbrieth, won the 2013 Eric Hoffer YA Book Award. Every year since, I have had the first draft of the next book in the series ready to read on our vacation and my sons became my first and most ferocious editors.

By day I work for a human rights organization whose mission is to protect human rights and end poverty for some of the poorest and most marginalized people in the world. Occasionally these worlds fuse together as my stories carry elements of the values I want to share with my sons – friendship, loyalty, doing the right thing, freedom etc. At a recent speaking engagement for my human rights work, the organizer introduced me as “Alon Shalev, who speaks about human rights and writes about elves and dwarves.” Remind me to always send a bio and avoid being googled!

2. What types of books do you write, and why?

Epic fantasy novels allow an author to create whatever reality s/he wants. In my case, it became a vehicle to convey certain beliefs to my sons. Ever tried lecturing your children? Don’t bother. Through the characters I created, they were exposed to strong female roles, dictatorial leadership, power, racism, slavery, and violence.

I am inspired to write novels that offer a respite to teenagers and young people from the intense and harsh world they are propelled into at too early an age, but stories that have relevance in their lives.

3. What were your early influences, and how does this manifest in your work today?

Stephen Donaldson (The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant) was a big influence on creating a distinct and detailed world. I remember reading The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings when I was a teenager, but then I moved away from epic fantasy.

I owe a lot to Christopher Paolini (The Inheritance Series) because his amazing novels captivated my eldest son and we read the books together. I think more than anyone else (though there were many fine authors along the way), Paolini gets the credit for motivating me to write for my sons and offer them the sheer pleasure that he did.

4. Are there aspects of the craft that excite you more than others?

I truly believe that the craft itself is magical. For me, the ability to allow the story to flow onto the page, to breathe life and personality into characters, and be stunned at an unexpected plot twist. I have cried as beloved characters died at my fingertips without me anticipating it, and been unable to sleep or had nightmares before a battle.

I write the first draft very fast (100,000 words will take maybe three months) and it is truly an adrenaline rush. The story dominates my mind and when walking the dog or at the gym, I am imagining conversations between characters, or how a subplot will develop. My family suffers during this time and I appreciate their support and understanding.

I actually love the process of editing – I know, I’m weird like that – but it sometimes feels like the first draft is a roughly carved piece of wood (or clay). It is enough to know what I want the finished product to look like, but the editing is what provides the intricacy and nuance. It becomes the finished product and allows others to see what I had envisioned while writing. I have to admit, however, I have no talent with woodcarving or pottery.

5. What books or websites are your go-to places while editing?

I take editing very seriously. It is what allows me the freedom to write quickly and without any internal critique, and this is critical to allow the intense creative flow. I formed a writers group about 10 years ago, which meets weekly, and it continues to thrive after over 500 meetings. We each read a chapter aloud and the group follows with distributed copies and writes comment on the pages. Some of my finest passages are a result of the group all writing that something is not working and must change. When I see lots of scrawl on several people’s copies, I know I must put my ego aside and rewrite. The results are always much better and I deeply appreciate their feedback.

Beta readers are also invaluable. These are people who commit to reading your manuscript within perhaps six weeks and offering a detailed analysis. This covers not only spelling and grammar, but feedback about plot, characters, style of writing. These people do not get paid. Their views are impartial and they are motivated by their love for reading and desire to be part of the incredibly creative process of bringing a story to life.

6. Tell us about your writing space (music/snacks/interruptions/etc.)

I arrive at my office at least an hour, often an hour and a half, before work. There is no one there and I can blast music and write to my heart’s content. Knowing that I have a cut-off time motivates me to write fast and focus.

The truth is, I can write anywhere. My desk at home is in the kitchen. I just need to swivel my chair round to sit at the dinner table. I have a good pair of headphones and a variety of music that enables me to ignore everything around me. So I can sit in a café, an airport, a house bustling with people and animals, and lose myself to my writing. I have twice, upon landing from a cross-country flight, resented the quick six-hour flight.

Coffee is important fuel for my writing and I have certain music that pushes me when I am creating. Symphonic rock, anyone? Nightwish, Beyond Temptation, Epica… I tend to edit listening to quieter music – Ed Sheeran, Lorde, Chainsmokers are my current favorites.

7. Tell us about your current WIP or your latest book release.

Having concluded two trilogies for the Wycaan Masters, I turned my attention to a more adult, darker medieval fantasy, bordering on grimdark. I have been really struck by Joe Abercrombie and Brent Weeks. Terry Goodkind has been a long-time favorite. Writing for adults allows a certain freedom to delve deeper into the human psyche and there are more opportunities to reveal characters by putting them in more extreme scenarios.

The novel is currently titled Kingfisher: Slave to Honor and I have submitted it to Inkitt, an interesting publisher who decides whether to publish a book based on a set of analytics. It is an interesting model and I have written about it here. You can download a free ebook, but please leave comments and a review to help Kingfisher stay in contention.


Curious to know more about Alon Shalev? Be sure to visit his website, hang out on his blog, ElfWriter, connect with him on Twitter, stalk him on Facebook, or poke around his bookshelf on Goodreads.

Don’t forget to check out this year’s Winterviews and partner interviews. You can also follow Hàlön Chronicles and be the first to know when new content is released.

Original article posted on my main blog, Hàlön Chronicles.

Winterview with Simone Cottrell of The Artist’s Laboratory Theatre

To celebrate 13 weeks of winter, Hàlön Chronicles will be conducting one interview a week for 13 weeks. We’ve also partnered with additional artists and authors for a few surprises throughout the winter. Join us on the hashtag #13Winterviews, or check out our blog hop for a sneak peek at who’s on the roster in the coming weeks.

Hosted by: K. J. Harrowick

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself.

The daughter of a Cambodian refugee and a Marine Corps Vietnam Veteran, Simone Cottrell is the Director of Outreach for Artist’s Laboratory Theatre, Fayetteville, Arkansas. Simone earned her B.A. in Communication-Theatre from Mississippi State University (MSU) in 2008 and then trained at Lexington Children’s Theatre. She later studied English and creative writing at MSU and received further training at Martha’s Vineyard Institute for Creative Writing. Simone has held positions with MSU’s College of Arts & Sciences (research, graduate studies) and with Trike Theatre. Simone was nominated by the Tishman Review for the 2016 PEN America/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers.

2. What types of work you produce in the community, and why?

I exist in so many communities – as many of us do – so I thrive in finding the common bonds in each community in my career as the Director of Outreach with The Artist’s Laboratory Theatre (a community-based, site specific professional theatre) and as a writer. Artist’s Lab has over 20 programs working with the VA, Latinx immigrants, black poets, homeless youth, the Marshallese community, and the list goes on. We begin devising theatre with creative writing first. We don’t expect the groups that we work with to have years of experience in the arts. What we do recognize is that each person has a story to tell and we use their stories to raise awareness in the community.

I can pretty much tell you that almost every message from each community or in-group has been the same – to be noticed and respected for who they are. Humans are complicated creatures and as much as we’d like to ignore ours or others’ emotional, mental, spiritual, and physical nuances, they exist. So, specifically the work that I like to produce is to bring these differences up to the surface, create a narrative or strengthen one that is already exists into creative writing that may or may not be transformed into a production. I want to be able to use my artistic strengths to manifest a brave and safe space for healthy dialogue.

3. What were your early influences, and how does this manifest in your work today?

If we’re talking about what I enjoyed most as a child, hands-down The Babysitters Club series. Claudia Kishi was the only Asian American character in ALL of the books I read. She’s the reason why I kept trying to join an elite visual arts club for gifted students and I finally made it in the 4th grade. She’s also the reason why I tried to start a neighborhood babysitting club in my old trailer park, but that place was rough and we kids could take care of ourselves by the time we were 9.

As I grew, so did my reading choices. I had a recent boyfriend tell me, after looking at my book collection, that I am highly attracted to misfit characters. He wasn’t wrong. I like the underdogs. I like imperfection and flaws. There’s something magically human about a flawed character. Could explain why I’m not longer with the boyfriend who liked to read me through my book choices.

4. Are there aspects of the craft that excite you more than others?

I guess this is the teaching side of me, but I love editing, especially other people’s work. There’s something satisfying about providing a different perspective. It’s like, “Thank you for welcoming into your creative writing home and here’s a word gift that I think would look great next to your window.” I think editing is an encouraging and supportive experience.

5. What are your go-to places when searching for inspiration?

No joke? Bars. You get the best characters in bars. Try it some time. Go to the same bar at three different times – Sunday early afternoon, Wednesday when you get off of work, and Friday at midnight – and you’ll get three different crowds. I also flirt with the bartenders to hand over some dish about their regulars or to overhear bar conversations for me. If you’re also single, you automatically create mystery and intrigue with your notebook (in my case, bar napkins) and pen.

6. Tell us about your writing space (music/snacks/interruptions/etc.)

I love working on the floor, tummy down. I’ve done this since I was a kid – to color, read, play checkers. It’s my comfort zone for creativity. Sometimes I listen to podcasts (FriendsLikeUs is my current fave), cello, and jazz. No snacks. I will snack myself to death if I had the choice of immortality. I creative write for 2 – 3 hours and I need my industry standard of a 15 minute break. Sometimes I’ve forgotten to take breaks and will go for 8 hours without eating, drinking, or the bathroom. Turns out? That’s not okay.

7. Tell us about your current project(s).

My last personal project was writing two historical monologues for the Fayetteville, Arkansas, Evergreen Cemetery tour in November 2017. That was the first time I’d written monologues that were performed by professional actors. One of the actors asked me if I was upset with her portrayal of Lessie Stringfellow Read. I told her, “No. That was me trying not to puke all over the a headstone because I was so nervous!” But it was beautiful and lovely and everything I could’ve hoped for.

Currently, I’m quite the busy creative writing teaching bee for the local VA – Veterans Healthcare System of the Ozarks. Artist’s Lab partners with the VA under the national program Healing Arts, which provides four different components of the arts to in-patients and out-patients. As Director of Outreach, I teach the creative writing for the in-patient mental health ward. My Artistic Director, the amazing Erika Wilhite, teaches ensemble acting classes with the out-patients, and we hire an art therapist and a creative writing teaching artist to also lead mask workshops and creative writing at another campus location. Because we are the only theatre to be doing this kind of work in the region, we are now looking forward to partnering with our Arkansas senators to have support in joining the Library of Congress’s Veteran Storytelling Project. We are on the cusp of something huge and I can’t wait to see how the foundations now will serve so many in the future.


Curious to know more about Simone and The Artist’s Laboratory Theatre? Here’s how:

“So, I’m super sorry to say this, but I don’t place my creative writing on the internet. I’m old-school and private like that. Having said that, I’m also a Gen-x’er/Millenial and will definitely overshare the heck out of my progress as a human in her 30s, Artist’s Lab’s progress, or just a funny cat photo now and again. Definitely feel free to say “HEEEEY GIRL HEEEY!” on my Twitter – @Sim1_Says. I’d love to know what acts of #radicalcompassion you’re into these days and let’s collaborate! You can also reach me at simone@artlabtheatre.org to learn more about what we do or find The Artist’s Laboratory Theatre on ye olde Facebook to keep up with our programs and how we’re making social change in Northwestern Arkansas.”

Don’t forget to check out this year’s Winterviews and partner interviews. You can also follow Hàlön Chronicles and be the first to know when new content is released.

Original article posted on my main blog, Hàlön Chronicles.

Winterviews 2017-2018

A great post by Hilary about Winterviews! 🙂

Songs Wrote My Story

Once again, I have the great honour of being a partner with the lovely K.J. Harrowick’s Winterviews Blog Hop!

Mind you, I’ve been a pretty lousy partner this year, being so caught up in the real world. But better late than never, right?

Winterviews is an author interview series that takes place in the frigid winter months. It’s the perfect weekly get away, just snuggle up in your blanket, grab your hot beverage of choice, and read about these fantastic authors.

You ready for this?

(I’ll be linking all the interviews to this post as they go live, so keep an eye on this post for new interviews!)

Winterviews is Coming
Blog Hop Overview
Meet Kat – The Mastermind Behind This Whole Thing

Partner Interviews

Hilary @ SongsWroteMyStory
Angela – Science Fiction Writer
Maria – Neurosurgeon and Fantasy Writer
Chloe – Romance Writer
Lexi – Romance Writer
Kaelan – Erotic…

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Winterview with Sarah J. Sover

To celebrate 13 weeks of winter, Hàlön Chronicles will be conducting one interview a week for 13 weeks. We’ve also partnered with additional artists and authors for a few surprises throughout the winter. Join us on the hashtag #13Winterviews, or check out our blog hop for a sneak peek at who’s on the roster in the coming weeks.

Hosted by: K. J. Harrowick

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Sover

As a stay-at-home mom, I’m living proof that too much child programming leads to a few loose screws. Or maybe they were always loose, I can’t remember anymore! When I’m not a pregnant hermit, I enjoy blues dancing and metal concerts, but life these days consists of some writing, a little reading, raising a vibrant 4 year old, and binging bad superhero spin-offs on Netflix.

2. What types of books do you write, and why?

I write adult fantasy. It’s my happy place, and I can’t imagine living anywhere else, though I’ll always write whatever possesses me. The world can be overwhelming, and fantasy offers me the ability to deal with real issues in a wondrous world where anything is possible, frequently with elements of humor.

3. What were your early influences, and how does this manifest in your work today?

Strangely, as a teen, I only read classic literature and poetry with some trysts into metaphysical studies. I didn’t branch into genre fiction until college, and I still feel like I’m playing catch-up. As a result, my influences are cross-genre. Favorite books include The Alchemist, The poetry of John Donne, The Count of Monte Cristo, Mistborn trilogy, The Secret Garden, and The Lies of Locke Lamora. I also take inspiration from music and movies.

4. Are there aspects of the craft that excite you more than others?

I’m a pantser who drastically underwrites the first draft, so the most exciting part for me is when I finish the bones and start adding meat. The novel taking shape is the biggest thrill for me, and it’s what drives me. I can’t stand having to be derailed for note-taking and research, unless that research involves watching heist flicks with my husband and a hoppy IPA (true story). Other than that, querying is pretty awful, but I think that’s the general consensus.

5. What books or websites are your go-to places while editing?

I go back and forth between Scrivener and Word. I like seeing my text in different formats to allow it to feel fresh.

6. Tell us about your writing space (music/snacks/interruptions/etc.)

I have a desk in the corner of a quiet room, but I rarely use it. Most frequently, I sit at the table or on the couch with my laptop while my kid plays in the yard. Though I’m a music lover, I can’t write with music or I’ll find myself belting out Broadway tunes or head-banging instead of focusing. So, I guess my writing space is my pub-inspired dining room.

7. Tell us about your current WIP or your latest book release.

My current WIP is jokingly entitled Fairy GodMURDER on my desktop. It’s about a fairy godmother going rogue to avenge the death of her first charge at the hands of a serial killer. I’m still in the laying bones stage, so it’s slow-going, but once I get through the first draft, I expect to have the rest knocked out within six months or so.


Curious to know more about Sarah? Be sure to visit her Facebook Page or connect with her on Twitter.

Don’t forget to check out this year’s Winterviews and partner interviews.

Original article posted on my main blog site, Hàlön Chronicles. You can follow Winterviews here, or on my main blog and be the first to know when new content is released.

Meet Kat – Winterviews Creator, Web Developer and Fantasy & Science Fiction Writer

To celebrate 13 weeks of winter, Hàlön Chronicles will be conducting one interview a week for 13 weeks. We’ve also partnered with additional artists and authors for a few surprises throughout the winter. Join us on the hashtag #13Winterviews, or check out our blog hop for a sneak peek at who’s on the roster in the coming weeks.

Hosted by: K. J. Harrowick

1. First off, tell us a little bit about who you are and what type of books you write.

Genorä (Greetings) and welcome to Hàlön Chronicles!

I’m Kat, hostess and creator of Winterviews. The project kicked off in 2016 as a way to meet other writers and get their wonderful work into the universe. I’d read so many fantastic, unpublished stories from beta readers and critique partners that I couldn’t let their light sit on the shelves and get dusty. Since then, several of their stories have been published, and these writers and artists are conquering their corner of the world. Winterviews was such a hit, that I’ve brought it back for a second year with six wonderful partners. You can meet them all here.

For those who haven’t met me yet, I’m a Fantasy and Science Fiction writer currently hailing from the Pacific Northwest. I write adult novels of a much darker nature—sex, violence, war, magic and yes… getting swallowed by a dragon. Feel free to throw up. All of my characters tend to be older, with lives already half-lived. They’ve suffered loss, defeat, and destruction, and they’re looking for a second chance of happiness. Even if they have to lose everything again to get it.

Most of the stories are currently written in the Hàlön or Infinus universes, but each needs a shameful amount of restructuring and editing. My most polished novel, BLOOD & FIRE, ASH & BONE, is currently out on query.

2. What projects are you working on these days?

BLOODFLOWER is a swords & sorcery science fiction which takes place on Sandaris, a stolen moon snared inside the starship Hàlön.

Jàden’s final exams will determine her entrance into the Bioengineering Guild, but when her magical link to the Violet Flame—a universal etheric energy—is exposed, she’s abducted by her boyfriend’s father and a biotherics doctor intent on creating a new reality. For two years she’s starved and tortured, her mind torn apart until the Flame’s energy flows freely through her veins.

When her boyfriend, Enforcer Jason Kale, attempts a rescue, he’s killed in a starship explosion. Jàden’s shoved into hypersleep where her body is suspended, but her mind is awake and alive.

When her hypersleep chamber opens, Jàden wakes to a world of swords and sorcery, and an arrow in her shoulder. Now she’s on the run to escape the northern armies, fighting to stay alive, and searching for the reincarnated Jason Kale. After using her powers to protect a small band of warriors, it awakens her old captors from hypersleep, and they are hunting her again. This time to wield her power against an encroaching empire.

3. Do you have any strong social or political statements your work aims to represent?

I strive for my work to step away from modern political and social constructs and give readers some breathing space from this universe. However, I have a deep love of conspiracy theories—the weirder the better. So, my work tends to take some of the more far-fetched ones and weave them into the roots of each story.

4. Who is your favorite dragon?

Ohmva, obviously. Ohmva is a fairly young dragon who lives under a suppressive dictatorship. He’s the liaison between his kin and the human kingdom of Sgådnor, growing up first with Haruk Mardkin, then his son, Darian Mardkin.

Ohmva has a lithe, sinewy body beneath a bony exoskeleton. His fire burns blue, so when he ignites his flame, it glows from his two eye sockets and between each of the bony joints along his body. When he agrees to bond with Darian, things go horribly wrong. Instead of creating healing fire, both Ohmva and Darian become sick and struggle to stay alive. You can find a piece of Ohmva’s tale in Blood & Fire, Ash & Bone.

5. What is your favorite spaceship?

Hàlön. It’s a black ring that rotates around the Sandarin moon. Its hull is divided into six sections, each controlled by a key that opens and closes the gateway between the starship and the moon’s surface. Hàlön can be found in Bloodflower, Firestone and Ironstar, though the reader won’t see too much of the ship in the series’ first installment.

6. Favorite wind-down-after-a-hard-day beverage?

I don’t get to indulge as often as I’d like, but it’s definitely red beer: a bottle of Alaskan Amber and two shots of clamato juice. Served best with a black & blue burger on any Pacific Northwest seaside dock.


If you want to know more about me and my work, feel free to peruse the rest of my blog, hang out with me on Twitter, stalk me on Facebook, or you can follow my blog and receive an email each time new content comes out.

Don’t forget to check out this year’s Winterviews and partner interviews, which kicks off 21 December 2017.

Original article posted on my blog, Hàlön Chronicles.

Meet Kaelan – Winterviews Partner & Erotic Speculative Fiction Romance Author

To celebrate 13 weeks of winter, Hàlön Chronicles will be conducting one interview a week for 13 weeks. We’ve also partnered with additional artists and authors for a few surprises throughout the winter. Join us on the hashtag #13Winterviews, or check out our blog hop for a sneak peek at who’s on the roster in the coming weeks.

Hosted by: K. J. Harrowick

1. First off, tell us a little bit about who you are and what type of books you write.

Kaelan3
I’m Kae, I’m as non-binary author who tends to enjoy playing in my science-fantasy world Ilavani, and in my paranormal romance world showcased in the Ace Assassin series.

2. What projects are you working on these days?

I’m working on the 2nd book in the Ace Assassin series. Book one, Bloodbound, is coming out from Ninestar Press on April 30, 2018 and the sequel is tentatively entitled Soulbound. It’s a polyamorous, kinky, romance featuring Welsh folkloric creatures. Shapeshifters, vampires, gods, monsters, oh my!

3. Do you have any strong social or political statements your work aims to represent?

All throughout my work you’ll find elements of kink, being queer (many of the QUILTBAG letters apply to me, so you’ll find those things represented in my work), polyamory, environmentalism, autistic rep, and mixed-race rep.

4. Who is your favorite dragon?

Smaug. There is no other dragon.

5. What is your favorite spaceship?

Serenity.

6. Favorite wind-down-after-a-hard-day beverage?

A glass of Shiraz or in the summer, maybe a Moscato.


Want to know more about Kaelan? You can check out her blog: Kaelan Rhywiol, hang out with her on Twitter, or stalk her on Facebook. Kaelan can also be found on Pinterest, Instagram, Books and Main Bites (@KaelanRhy), and Mastadon (@KaelanRhy@mastodon.social). Kaelan also has a wide variety of books available on Amazon.

Don’t forget to check back on more Winterviews and partner interviews.

Original article posted on my main blog site, Hàlön Chronicles.